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  1. This was a really hard fought round. Bologan's creative play was "awarded" with a most undeserved defeat. Giri's opening preparation seemed rather poor and he was soon worse against Wang's convincing play. Carlsen played a Bogo-Indian and came out of the opening quite well (unusual in recent times!). Did he miss a win on move 44? maybe... [pgn][Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.26"] [Round "4"] [White "Bologan, Viktor"] [black "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D20"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "162"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. d4 {I think Bologan is more of a King Pawn player.} d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. e4 Nf6 4. e5 Nd5 5. Bxc4 Nb6 6. Bb3 Nc6 7. Be3 Bf5 8. Ne2 e6 9. Nbc3 Qd7 10. a3 O-O-O 11. Rc1 Kb8 12. O-O Qe8 13. Ba4 (13. Ng3 $5 Nxe5 14. Nxf5 exf5 15. Re1 $44) ( 13. Na4 $2 Nxe5 14. Nxb6 axb6 15. Bf4 Nc6 16. Ng3 Bg6 $17) 13... Nxa4 14. Qxa4 Bd3 15. d5 $5 {An interesting try, but it doesn't seem to work. There was nothing wrong with the "usual" 15.Rfd1} (15. Rfd1 Bxe2 16. Nxe2 Ne7 17. Qa5 Nd5 18. Rc4) 15... exd5 16. Rfd1 Bxe2 17. Nxe2 {For his P, white's pieces definitely look more threatening. a7 is under pressure.} Be7 {Most humans would rather play 17...a6 here. Apparently, Hikaru was quite happy with the position after the sacrifice on c6.} (17... a6) 18. Rxc6 Qxc6 19. Qxa7+ Kc8 20. Nd4 Qa6 21. Qxa6 bxa6 22. Nc6 Rd7 23. b4 (23. Rxd5 $2 {I'm pretty sure Nakamura had seen this.} Rhd8 $1 $17) 23... Kb7 {Objectively, white doesn't have enough compensation for the exchange.} 24. Rc1 d4 (24... Re8 25. f4 g6 26. Kf2) 25. Bxd4 f6 26. f4 (26. e6 Rd6 27. Nxe7 Rxd4 28. Nf5 Re4 29. Nxg7 Rg8 30. Nf5 Rxe6 $17) 26... fxe5 27. fxe5 (27. Bxe5 Bd6) 27... Bg5 28. Rc4 Re8 29. Kf2 Rf7+ 30. Ke2 Re6 31. Na5+ Kc8 32. g3 Rh6 33. h4 Bd8 34. Be3 Re6 35. Bf4 Bf6 36. Re4 Rfe7 37. Nc4 g6 38. Re3 Bg7 39. Kf3 Rc6 40. Na5 Rce6 41. Nc4 h6 42. g4 Rd7 43. Ke4 Bf8 44. Rf3 Rf7 45. Rc3 Rd7 46. Be3 Kd8 47. Rb3 Ke8 48. h5 {I'm not sure about this, as now h5 is a target.} (48. b5 axb5 49. Rxb5 Ra6 {And white's a P is more of a weakness than an asset.}) 48... gxh5 49. gxh5 Rc6 50. Nb2 Rc2 {...Rh2 is a threat now.} 51. Bf4 Rf7 52. a4 Re2+ 53. Be3 Rf1 (53... Rh2 $1) 54. Nd3 Be7 55. Nf4 Ra2 56. Nd5 Bd8 57. a5 (57. Bxh6 {I think it was important to get rid of black's h P. White's drawing chances improve considerably, as all of black's PP are on the same side now.} Rxa4 58. Nc3 (58. Bg7 a5 59. h6 Rh1 {And black threatens ...c6.}) 58... Raa1 59. Bd2 {Covering the e1 square. I think white should be able to draw this.}) 57... c6 58. Nf4 Rh2 59. Ne6 Rh4+ 60. Kd3 Rd1+ 61. Kc2 Re1 $6 (61... Rd5 $1) 62. Rd3 Bg5 (62... Rxh5 $4 63. Ng7+ $18) 63. Nc7+ Ke7 64. Bc5+ Kf7 65. Nxa6 {Black's taking too many risks!} Rh2+ 66. Kb3 Rb1+ (66... Rxe5 $4 67. Bd6) 67. Kc4 Rh4+ 68. Kc3 Ra1 69. Kb2 Rhh1 70. Nb8 Rhb1+ 71. Kc3 Rc1+ 72. Kd4 Ke6 73. Nxc6 {It's black who's fighting for a draw now!} Rc2 74. Ke4 Re1+ 75. Kf3 Rf1+ 76. Kg4 (76. Ke4 $4 Rf4+ 77. Ke3 Rxb4+ 78. Kf3 Rf4+ 79. Kg3 Rxc5 $19) 76... Rg2+ 77. Kh3 Ra2 78. a6 $2 (78. Nd4+ {It was important to prevent ...Kf5.}) 78... Kf5 $1 {Suddenly black is threatening mate, starting with ...Rh1.} 79. Nd4+ $2 (79. a7 $4 Rh1+ 80. Kg3 Bf4+ 81. Kf3 Rh3#) (79. Ne7+ $1 Bxe7 80. Bxe7 Kf4 81. Rd4+ Kxe5 82. Rc4 Rxa6 $15) 79... Ke4 80. Rf3 (80. Rb3 Rh1+ 81. Kg3 Bf4+ 82. Kg4 Rg2+ 83. Rg3 Rxg3#) 80... Rh1+ 81. Kg3 Bh4+ {A sad end to a hard fought game. I feel white deserved a lot better than a loss...} (81... Bh4+ 82. Kg4 Rg2+ 83. Rg3 Rxg3#) 0-1 [Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.26"] [Round "4"] [White "Giri, Anish"] [black "Wang Hao"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E84"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "114"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 O-O 6. Be3 Nc6 7. Nge2 a6 8. Qd2 Rb8 9. Rc1 {This move has become quite popular.} (9. Rb1 {With the idea of b4, is a strong alternative.}) 9... Bd7 (9... e5 {This looks like the standard reply here, but white's well prepared to meet it.} 10. d5 Na5 11. Nd1 $1 c5 12. b4 $1 cxb4 13. Qxb4 b6 (13... b5 $6 14. Nec3 $16) 14. Nec3 Re8 15. Na4 Nd7 16. Nxb6 (16. Rb1 $5) 16... Nxc4 17. Qxc4 (17. Rxc4 Nxb6 18. Rc6 Nd7 19. Qxd6 Qa5+ (19... Bf8 20. Qc7 Bb4+ 21. Kf2 $16) 20. Bd2 Qxa2 21. Rxc8 $2 (21. Bxa6 Bf8 22. Bc4 Qb1 23. Qc7 Bb4 {With some compensation, not sure if it's enough though.}) 21... Rexc8 22. Qxd7 Rc2 $17) 17... Nxb6 18. Qc7 Nd7 19. Qxd6 Qa5+ (19... Bf8 20. Qc7 Bb4+ 21. Kf2 Qe7 $16) 20. Bd2 Qxa2 21. Nc3 (21. Rxc8 $2 Rexc8 22. Qxd7 Rc2 $17) 21... Qb2 {This happened in the game Rowson - Mestel, West Bromwich 2005, which eventually ended in a draw. Instead of Rowson's 22.Qc7, 22.Rb1 looks better for white now.}) 10. Nd1 Re8 (10... b5 $6 {is now strongly met by} 11. c5 $1 e6 12. Nf2 Qe7 (12... b4 $6 13. g3 Na5 14. Nd3 dxc5 15. Nxc5 $16 { Black's << is in ruins.} Bb5 16. Nf4 g5 17. Nfd3 Nc6 18. Ne5 g4 $4 19. Bxb5 { 1-0 Nenashev-Gadjily, Dubai 2000}) 13. cxd6 cxd6 14. g3 {/\ Bg2} Qd8 15. Bg2 Qa5 16. Qxa5 Nxa5 17. b3 Rfc8 18. Kd2 $14 {and White has a strong P [+], therefore the space advantage as well, Conquest-Kindermann, Germany 2000.}) ( 10... e6 $5 {is an interesting, unusual plan.} 11. g3 Ne8 12. Bg2 f5 13. O-O Nf6 14. Nf2 Qe7 15. f4 (15. b4 $5) 15... fxe4 16. d5 Nd8 17. Nc3 Nf7 18. Ncxe4 Nxe4 19. Nxe4 e5 20. Rfe1 Bf5 $13 {Hertneck-Schmaltz, Germany 1998}) (10... e5 11. d5 Ne7 12. c5 $5 {White has the same reaction, as in case of 10...b5.} (12. g3 Ne8 13. Bg2 c5 14. b4 b6 15. O-O f5 16. Nf2 {1/2-1/2 Bischoff-Nunn, Paignton 2000}) (12. b4 $5) 12... Ne8 (12... dxc5 13. Bxc5 Ne8 {/\ Nd6 is a possibility transposing after} 14. Nec3 {to the game continuation.}) 13. b4 { against 13...dxc5} (13. Nec3 dxc5 $5 {vacating the d6 square for the blockading N comes into consideration.} (13... f5 14. Bd3 (14. b4 {- 13.b4})) ( 13... c6 14. cxd6 Nxd6 15. Bc5 $14) 14. Bxc5 Nd6 15. Bd3 f5 16. O-O Kh8 {/\ Ng8, Bh6}) 13... f5 14. Nec3 (14. Ndc3 Nf6) 14... Nf6 15. Be2 {Finally White can finish his development.} Kh8 16. Nb2 {/\ Nc4 improving the N and waiting with 0-0.} (16. O-O {castles into Black's standard ->.} f4 17. Bf2 g5) 16... Nc8 {If this is necessary, then White's advantage is undisputable in the opening. He has a strong pressure on the <<, while Black's chances for a >> -> are problematic.} (16... f4 17. Bf2 g5 18. Nc4 {and White's K may remain in the [+] because of the closed character of the position.}) 17. Nc4 (17. O-O { now comes into consideration, after one of Black's pieces has left the >>.} f4 18. Bf2 g5 19. Qd1 $1 {against g4.} (19. Nc4 g4)) 17... fxe4 18. fxe4 Ng4 ( 18... Nh5 19. Bxh5 Qh4+ 20. Bf2 Qxh5 21. O-O g5 22. Be3 h6 23. Rxf8+ Bxf8 24. Rf1 Be7 25. Ne2 Qg6 26. Ng3 $16 {Graf-Mamedov, Dubai 2002}) 19. Bg5 ({or simply } 19. Bxg4 Bxg4 20. Bf2 $16 {/\ 0-0}) 19... Bf6 20. O-O Kg7 21. Rxf6 Nxf6 22. Bh6+ Kg8 23. Bxf8 Qxf8 24. Qe3 $16 {Graf-Nunn, BL 2001 CBM 82}) 11. Nf2 b5 ( 11... e6 $5) 12. c5 dxc5 13. Rxc5 e5 14. d5 Ne7 15. g3 {A strange new move. 15. Qc2 is the main line.} (15. Qc2 c6 (15... Rc8 {I think Wang would have gone fo this instead.} 16. Ng3 $1 {This is probably the critical position in this line. Balck needs a good idea, but it's not easy to find!} (16. Nd3 $2 Nexd5 $3 17. exd5 e4 18. fxe4 Nxe4 {With excellent compensation for the piece.}) 16... h5 ( 16... c6 $2 17. d6) 17. Bd3 $16 {And white will castle and put his other R on c1. It looks pretty bad for black.}) 16. dxc6 Nxc6 17. Rxc6 Bxc6 18. Qxc6 $16 { This happened in Graf,A (2635)-Nunn,J (2611)/Germany 2003. The game ended in a draw but black struggled...}) 15... c6 16. dxc6 Nxc6 17. Rc1 Rc8 18. Bg2 Be6 { Is this Giri's home preparation? because black seems a little better already!} 19. b3 {a2 needs protection.} (19. O-O Qxd2 20. Bxd2 Bxa2 $17) 19... Qxd2+ 20. Bxd2 Red8 $15 21. Bg5 Nb4 22. Nc3 Rd7 23. Ke2 Rdc7 24. Bd2 Bf8 (24... Nc6 $5 { This looks very strong also, eyeing the d4 square.}) 25. Bh3 Nc6 26. Nd5 { Giving up a P, but white's position was very difficult already.} (26. Bxe6 Nd4+ 27. Kd1 fxe6 $1 {And white's in trouble.}) 26... Nxd5 27. exd5 Nd4+ 28. Ke3 Rxc1 29. Rxc1 (29. Bxc1 Rc3+ $19) 29... Rxc1 30. Bxc1 Bxd5 $17 31. Ne4 Bg7 32. g4 f5 33. gxf5 gxf5 34. Nd2 Kf7 35. Bb2 Kg6 36. Bg2 (36. Bxd4 exd4+ 37. Ke2 Be5 $19) 36... Ne6 37. Kf2 Kf6 38. a4 Bf8 39. axb5 axb5 40. Bf1 Bb4 41. Nb1 Bc5+ 42. Kg3 Bd4 (42... f4+ $1 43. Kg2 b4 44. Bc4 Bxc4 45. bxc4 Bd4 $19) 43. Bxd4 Nxd4 44. Nc3 Bxf3 45. Nxb5 f4+ 46. Kf2 Nxb5 47. Kxf3 Nd4+ 48. Kg4 Nxb3 $19 49. Bd3 h6 50. Bb5 Nd2 51. Bc6 Ke6 52. Bb7 Kd6 53. h4 Kc5 54. Kh5 f3 55. Kxh6 e4 56. h5 f2 57. Ba6 Nc4 {A most convicing win by Wang Hao and rather poor opening play by Giri.} 0-1 [Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.26"] [Round "4"] [White "Bacrot, Etienne"] [black "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "A40"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "111"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. d4 e6 2. c4 Bb4+ {Bogo-Indian.} 3. Bd2 Bxd2+ 4. Qxd2 d5 5. Nc3 Nf6 6. Nf3 O-O 7. e3 Qe7 8. Rc1 Rd8 9. cxd5 exd5 10. Bd3 Nc6 {This looks kind of odd, but it's actually a pretty good move here. Black prevents Ne5 and prepares ...Bg4 or even ...Ne4.} 11. Bb5 $1 {Against 11.0-0 both 11...Bg4 or 11...Ne4 look strong.} (11. O-O) 11... Rd6 12. Bxc6 $1 (12. O-O Bf5 13. Qd1 Bg4 14. Be2 {1/ 2-1/2 Shishkin,V (2532)-Kosic,D (2489) Bijelo Polje 2005}) 12... Rxc6 13. Ne5 Re6 {Blocking the B's diagonal, but black doesn't have anything better as 13... Rd6 would be met by 14.Nb5.} 14. f3 (14. O-O Ne4 15. Nxe4 dxe4 16. Qc2 c6) 14... b6 15. O-O Bb7 16. Rfe1 h6 (16... c5) 17. Ne2 c5 18. Nf4 Rd6 19. dxc5 bxc5 20. Ned3 {This forces the weakening of the d4 square, and d5 becomes backward. But black has a little more space and can play along the e and b files.} c4 21. Nb4 Rad8 22. Nc2 Nd7 23. Nd4 Ne5 24. Rc3 (24. Nf5 Qg5 {And the N has to retreat to d4, as ...Nxf3 is a thret.}) 24... Ra6 25. b3 Rb6 26. Rd1 Re8 27. Nc2 {Attacking d5.} Qf6 28. Ne1 (28. Nxd5 $4 Bxd5 (28... Nxf3+ $5 29. gxf3 Qxf3 $19) 29. Qxd5 Nxf3+ 30. Qxf3 Qxc3 $19) 28... a5 29. Qd4 Rb5 30. Nh5 Qg5 31. Ng3 Nc6 32. Qf4 (32. Qd2 d4 33. Rxc4 dxe3 $15) 32... Qxf4 33. exf4 Nb4 34. bxc4 dxc4 35. Rxc4 Nxa2 {Black gets a passed P on the a file, but is it enough?} 36. Ne4 Bd5 37. Rc5 Rxc5 38. Nxc5 Nc3 39. Ra1 a4 40. Ned3 Bb3 41. Ra3 Nb5 42. Ra1 Nd4 43. Nb2 a3 44. Nbd3 Ra8 $2 (44... Nc2 $1 {I think this move would have given Carlsen real winning chances.} 45. Rc1 (45. Rxa3 Nxa3 46. Nxb3 $17) (45. Nxb3 $2 Nxa1 46. Nxa1 Re3 $19) 45... Re3 46. Nxb3 (46. Kf2 Rxd3 47. Nxd3 a2) 46... Rxd3 47. Rxc2 Rxb3 48. Rc8+ Kh7 49. Ra8 Kg6 50. Ra5 Rb1+ 51. Kf2 Rb2+ 52. Ke3 a2 {And I doubt that white can hold this ending...}) 45. Nxb3 Nxb3 46. Ra2 Rd8 47. Ne1 Rd1 48. Kf2 Ra1 49. Rxa1 Nxa1 50. Ke2 a2 51. Kd3 Nb3 52. Nc2 f5 (52... a1=Q 53. Nxa1 Nxa1 54. Kc3) 53. Kc3 Nc1 54. Kd2 (54. g3 Kf7 55. Kb2 Ne2 56. Kxa2 Ke6 57. Kb3 Kd5 {And it is white who has to play with care.}) 54... Nb3+ 55. Kc3 Nc1 56. Kd2 1/2-1/2 [/pgn] bielannotatedR4.pgn
  2. Wang grabbed the lead with this, his fourth win. It's kind of sad because Bologan deserved better, the draw being at his reach had he not blundered on move 35. Let's not forget that he didn't have the time that the other players did to prepare against each other, that's an enourmous handicapp at this level... [pgn][Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.27"] [Round "5"] [White "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [black "Bacrot, Etienne"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E92"] [WhiteElo "2778"] [blackElo "2713"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "67"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. d5 a5 8. Bg5 { Petrosian's variation against the King's Indian Defence.} h6 9. Bh4 Na6 10. Nd2 Qe8 11. O-O h5 12. a3 Bd7 13. b3 Nh7 14. f3 f5 15. Rb1 g5 16. Bf2 f4 17. b4 axb4 18. axb4 Qg6 19. c5 g4 20. c6 {All book so far!} bxc6 (20... g3 21. cxd7 ( 21. Be1 bxc6 22. dxc6 Be6 23. Bc4 Rfb8 24. Bxe6+ Qxe6 25. Nd5 Qf7 26. b5 Nc5 27. Nc4 Nf6 28. b6 Nxd5 29. Qxd5 Qxd5 30. exd5 cxb6 31. Nxd6 Bf8 32. Nb5 Rd8 33. Rd1 e4 34. Bc3 e3 35. Rfe1 Ra2 36. d6 Rc2 37. Bf6 Ra8 38. Nd4 Rf2 39. d7 Nd3 40. Re2 Bc5 41. c7 Kf7 42. d8=Q {1-0 Flores,D (2439)-Mahia,G (2377)/ Asuncion 2003}) 21... gxf2+ 22. Rxf2 Nf6 23. Bxa6 bxa6 24. Qa4 Qf7 25. Nc4 Nxd7 26. Ra2 Bf6 27. Qc6 Rac8 28. Qxa6 Kh8 29. Nb5 Rg8 30. Rc1 Be7 31. Ncxd6 cxd6 32. Rxc8 Bd8 33. Nxd6 Qf6 34. Nc4 Rxg2+ 35. Kxg2 {1-0 Letelier Martner,R (2235) -Barria Zuniga,D (2285)/Santiago de Chile 1995}) 21. dxc6 Be6 22. b5 $146 {A new move. 22.Bc4 had been tried before.} (22. Bc4 Bxc4 23. Nxc4 g3 24. Be1 gxh2+ 25. Kh1 Rac8 26. Nd5 Bf6 27. b5 Nb8 28. b6 Kh8 29. bxc7 Nxc6 30. Nxd6 Rg8 31. Rb2 h4 32. Nxc8 Rxc8 33. Nxf6 Qxf6 34. Qd7 Ne7 35. Rb8 Qf8 36. Bxh4 Rxb8 37. cxb8=Q Qxb8 38. Qxe7 Qb5 39. Rd1 {1-0 Seipp,T (2117)-Schaack,H (2276)/ Germany 2001}) 22... Nb8 $2 {Javier: Hard to believe. After this black is basically playing a piece down for the rest of the game. For good or worse, 22. ..Nc5 had to be played.} (22... Nc5 $5 23. Bxc5 (23. fxg4 $6 hxg4 24. Bc4 Bxc4 25. Nxc4 g3 26. Bxc5 gxh2+ 27. Kh1 (27. Kxh2 dxc5 28. Qd5+ Kh8 29. Qxc5 $2 Qg3+ 30. Kg1 Qxc3 $19) 27... dxc5 28. Qd5+ Kh8 29. Qxc5 Rg8 $13) (23. b6 $5) 23... dxc5 24. Bc4 Bxc4 25. Nxc4 gxf3 26. Qxf3 Ng5 {And black gets counterplay.}) 23. Nd5 Bxd5 24. exd5 g3 25. Be1 $1 Ng5 26. Rb4 {Eyeing the e4 square.} (26. b6 $5) 26... h4 27. Ne4 h3 {Those 2 PP look kind of threatening, but it's a bit of an optical illusion, as black really doesn't have enough pieces attackng the white K.} 28. hxg3 fxg3 29. Qd2 (29. Nxg3 $1 {This would have been stronger.}) 29... Rf4 $2 (29... Nxe4 30. Rxe4 Bh6 31. Qd3 h2+ 32. Kh1 $18) (29... hxg2 $5 { I think this move would have given black some attacking chances.} 30. Kxg2 Nh3 $1 {Heading for f4.} 31. Bxg3 $1 (31. Kxh3 $2 Qh5+ 32. Kxg3 Bh6 {Threatening not only white's Q but also a nasty check on f4.}) 31... Bh6 32. Qb2 Nf4+ 33. Kh1 {White's probably still better, but at least black's got some chances.}) 30. Nxg5 Qxg5 $2 (30... Rxb4 31. Qxb4 (31. Ne6 Rb3 32. Bc4 Bh6 $13) 31... Qxg5) 31. gxh3 $1 Qf5 32. Bxg3 Qxh3 33. Bxf4 exf4 34. Qxf4 $18 {It's kind of odd how the whole game can be decided in just 2 or 3 critical moves. Bacrot was not up to the task this time...} 1-0 [Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.27"] [Round "5"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [black "Giri, Anish"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C42"] [WhiteElo "2837"] [blackElo "2696"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "97"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nf3 Nxe4 5. d3 Nf6 6. d4 d5 {This is actually a french defence now! 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd exd 4. Nf3 Nf6.} 7. Bd3 Bd6 8. O-O O-O 9. h3 h6 10. c4 dxc4 11. Bxc4 {Symmetry is broken. White gets an isolated P but his B is more active.} Nc6 12. Nc3 a6 13. Re1 Re8 14. Be3 { Black needs to get his other B out, but how? if ...Bf5, then Qb3 is a problem. d7 is too passive.} b5 15. Bf1 (15. Bb3 Bf5) 15... Bb7 (15... Bf5 16. g4 $5 Bh7 17. Bg2 b4 18. Na4 Be4 19. Nc5 $13) 16. Rc1 Ne7 17. Ne5 Ned5 18. Nxd5 Nxd5 19. Bd2 Qf6 20. Qh5 c5 {I think black has solved his opening problems very well...} 21. a4 c4 (21... cxd4 22. Ng4 Qg6 23. Rxe8+ Rxe8 24. Qxg6 fxg6 25. axb5 axb5 26. Bxb5 {And black can't be worse.}) 22. Re4 {Ng4 looks like a most dangerous threat now, as white has tactical ideas such as Nxh6+ and Rg4 coming up.} Bxe5 23. dxe5 Qg6 24. Qh4 {Planning Rg4.} Nf6 25. Ree1 (25. Rexc4 bxc4 26. exf6 { This might have been interesting with more pieces on the board. Here ...Re4! looks fine for black.}) 25... Ne4 26. Bc3 Rad8 27. axb5 axb5 28. Bb4 Nd2 {With the threat of ...Nf3.} 29. Qg4 Qxg4 30. hxg4 Nb3 31. Rb1 $8 Bc8 32. f3 Rd5 33. Rbd1 Red8 34. Bd6 Rxd1 35. Rxd1 Be6 36. Be2 f6 (36... Ra8 37. f4 Ra2 (37... g6 38. Be7) 38. f5 Rxb2 39. fxe6 fxe6 (39... Rxe2 $4 40. e7 $18) 40. Kf1 {Looks too risky for black.}) 37. exf6 gxf6 38. Bf4 Rxd1+ 39. Bxd1 Kg7 40. Be3 Bf7 41. f4 Bd5 42. Kf2 b4 43. Bc2 c3 44. bxc3 bxc3 45. Bf5 Nd2 46. Bd4 Ne4+ 47. Kg1 ( 47. Ke3 Nd6 48. Bd3 Bxg2 49. Bxc3 Kf7 $11) 47... Kf7 48. Bxe4 Bxe4 49. Bxc3 1/2-1/2 [Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.27"] [Round "5"] [White "Wang, Hao"] [black "Bologan, Viktor"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A58"] [WhiteElo "2739"] [blackElo "2732"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "93"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. d5 b5 {Benko gambit.} 4. cxb5 a6 5. bxa6 g6 6. Nc3 Bxa6 7. g3 d6 8. Nf3 Bg7 9. Bg2 O-O 10. Rb1 Bc8 $5 {Quite an interesting idea. Black wants to play ...Bf5 and if white goes e4, then the B can return to c8 and then Ba6 again, as the a6-f1 diagonal has become weaker. 10...Nbd7 is the usual move.} 11. Nd2 Bf5 12. e4 Bc8 13. O-O Ba6 14. Re1 {Was it worth the time invested? well, white's N would like to get to c4, but with the black B on a6, that's rather unlikely. This means that the d2 N isn't that useful on d2. In fact, from f3 it did support e4-e5.} Nfd7 15. Nf3 Bc4 16. Bf4 Nb6 (16... Bxa2 $2 17. Ra1 Bxc3 18. bxc3 Ra3 19. Qd2 Qa5 20. e5 $1 dxe5 21. Nxe5 Nxe5 22. Bxe5 {And white has a clear advantage despite material equality.}) 17. e5 $1 {No hesitation from Wang! He's sending out a very clear message: in the Benko, white should focus on the e4-e5 P break, and the best black can do is get his P back on the Qside whilst white gets the advantage playin in the center.} Bxa2 18. Ra1 Bxd5 19. Nxd5 Rxa1 20. Nxe7+ Qxe7 21. Qxa1 d5 (21... dxe5 22. Nxe5 Re8 23. Re3 $16) 22. e6 $1 fxe6 23. Bh3 e5 24. Nxe5 $16 Qf6 25. Qa7 Kh8 (25... g5 26. Ng4 Qxb2 27. Nh6+ $3 (27. Bxb8 $18) 27... Bxh6 (27... Kh8 28. Nf7+ Kg8 29. Nxg5 $18) 28. Be6+ Kh8 29. Be5+ Qxe5 30. Rxe5 Nc6 31. Qxb6 Nxe5 32. Qxc5 $18) 26. Re2 $2 {Wang probably expected ...g5 now, after which Bxg5! Qxg5, Nf7+ Rxf7, Qxf7 wins, because Re8 is unstoppable. But Black still has a defensive resource...} (26. Nd3 $1 {I think this would have won outright. Black can't defend the N on b8, the P on c5 and the N on b6 if the black Q moves. d5 is also on. Be5 is a possility as well. It's curtains!}) 26... Nc6 $1 (26... g5 $2 27. Bxg5 Qxg5 28. Nf7+ Rxf7 29. Qxf7 $18) 27. Nxc6 Qxc6 28. Re6 Qa4 $1 {This is the move that Wang probably missed. Who wouldn't? it involves sacrificing the N and the exchange on f4!} 29. Qxb6 Qd1+ 30. Bf1 Rxf4 $1 {Suddenly black gets excellent drawing chances.} 31. Qxc5 (31. gxf4 $4 Qg4+ 32. Kh1 Qf3+ 33. Kg1 Qg4+ 34. Bg2 Qd1+ $11) 31... Bd4 32. Qc8+ {Note that after this check, when the white R goes to e7 next move, the g4 square will be covered...} Kg7 33. Re7+ Rf7 (33... Kh6 $4 34. gxf4 $18) (33... Kf6 $4 34. Qf8+ $18) 34. Rxf7+ Kxf7 35. Qb7+ Ke6 $4 (35... Kf8 $1 {I'm not sure if white can win any more after this move. d5 can't be captured due to the discovered check ...Bxf2, and there's a lot of pressure against f2. I'm not sure if 35...Kf6 works also, but 35...Ke6 jus seems to lose.} 36. Qxh7 $2 Qd2 $1 {And it is white who's fighting for the draw!}) 36. Qxh7 {Now the difference is that white threatens to take on g6 with check.} Qb1 (36... Bxf2+ {The problem with this is that white can give back his B at the right time and reach a winning Q ending.} 37. Kxf2 Qd4+ 38. Ke1 (38. Kg2 Qe4+ 39. Kh3 Qf5+) 38... Qb4+ 39. Kd1 Qb3+ 40. Ke2 Qc4+ 41. Kd2 $1 Qxf1 42. Qxg6+ $18) 37. b4 Kd6 (37... Qc2 38. Bh3+ $1 Kf6 ( 38... Ke5 39. Qe7#) (38... Kd6 39. Qd7+ Ke5 40. Qe7#) 39. Qh8+ $18) 38. Qh6 Qf5 39. Qd2 Qe5 40. b5 (40. h4 $4 Qxg3+) 40... g5 41. Qc2 Qe4 42. Qd2 Qg4 43. Bg2 Kc5 44. Qc2+ Kxb5 45. Qb3+ Ka6 46. Qd3+ Kb6 47. h3 {Bologan resigned. He's losing his B.} 1-0 [/pgn]
  3. Only 2 games for this round. (as you know, morozevich withdrew and the game Bologan-Carlsen will be played on Sunday, the rest day) The 2 games are quite interesting. Nakamura played a Polugayevsky variation of the Sicilian, and at one point things looked rather promising for him... Giri played a great game on the white side of a King´s Indian. [pgn][Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.25"] [Round "3"] [White "Wang Hao"] [black "Nakamura, Hi"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B96"] [WhiteElo "2739"] [blackElo "2778"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "93"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 e6 7. f4 b5 { Polugayevsky's variation, not a regular guest at this level!} 8. e5 dxe5 9. fxe5 Qc7 10. exf6 Qe5+ 11. Be2 Qxg5 12. O-O $1 Ra7 13. Qd3 Rd7 14. Ne4 Qe5 15. Nf3 Qc7 (15... Qxb2 16. Qe3 {This is thought to be rather dangerous for black.} ) 16. Qe3 Bb7 17. Nfg5 (17. c4 {This is normally played here. I have my doubts about Wang's move...}) 17... h6 18. Qh3 $146 (18. Nxe6 $2 fxe6 19. Bh5+ Kd8 $19 {Pegoraro,N (2085)-Guliyev, N (2555) Villa San Giovanni 2005}) (18. fxg7 Bxg7 19. Nxf7 Bd4 20. Nf6+ Ke7 $1 21. Qxd4 Rxd4 22. Nxh8 Qxc2 $17) 18... g6 19. Bd3 Nc6 20. Kh1 Ne5 21. Rae1 Bb4 22. Re3 Bd5 23. Be2 Nc4 24. Rd3 Qe5 25. a3 Ba5 26. Bg4 Nd6 $2 {After this white gets a most powerful attack. Although black's position looked dangeorus, I don't think white had enougha fter 26...Nxb2!} ( 26... Nxb2 $1 27. Rxd5 Rxd5 28. Bxe6 fxe6 $19) 27. Rxd5 $3 Qxd5 28. Bxe6 $1 fxe6 29. f7+ Kd8 (29... Nxf7 $4 30. Nf6+ $18) (29... Rxf7 30. Nxd6+ Qxd6 31. Nxf7 O-O $8 32. Qf3 $16) 30. Nxe6+ Kc8 31. f8=Q+ Rxf8 32. Rxf8+ Bd8 33. Nxd6+ Kb8 $1 (33... Qxd6 34. Rxd8+ Rxd8 35. Nxd8+ Kxd8 36. Qd3 $18) 34. Rf1 Rxd6 35. Nxd8 Qc4 36. Rg1 Rxd8 37. Qg3+ Kb7 38. Qxg6 $18 Rd2 39. Qxh6 Rxc2 40. Qg7+ Kb6 41. b4 Qd3 42. Re1 Qe3 43. Qf6+ Kc7 44. Qf1 Rf2 45. Qg1 Qf4 46. h3 Qg3 47. Qh2 1-0 [Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.25"] [Round "3"] [White "Giri, A."] [black "Bacrot, E."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E97"] [WhiteElo "2696"] [blackElo "2713"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "73"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. O-O Nc6 8. d5 Ne7 9. b4 Nh5 10. g3 f5 11. Ng5 Nf6 12. f3 f4 13. b5 fxg3 14. hxg3 h6 15. Ne6 Bxe6 16. dxe6 Qc8 17. Nd5 Qxe6 18. Nxc7 Qh3 19. Rf2 Rac8 20. Rh2 {All book so far.} (20. Bf1 $6 Qxg3+ 21. Rg2 Qh3 22. b6 (22. Rxg6 $4 Qd7) 22... axb6 23. Nb5 Nh5 (23... Rcd8 24. Rxg6 Qh5 25. Rg2 Nxe4 $17) 24. Rxg6 Qh4 25. Rg4 Qf6 26. Bg2 Kh7 27. Qxd6 Rxc4 28. Ba3 Ng6 29. Qd5 Rfc8 30. Nd6 Rd4 31. Qxb7 Rd8 32. Nf5 R4d7 33. Qa6 Nhf4 34. Rb1 Rd1+ 35. Rxd1 Rxd1+ 36. Bf1 Nh3+ 37. Kh2 Ng5 38. Bg2 Nf4 39. Be7 Qg6 40. Bxg5 hxg5 41. Qb7 Rd2 42. Qe7 Rxa2 43. Kg1 b5 44. Bf1 Qb6+ 45. Kh1 Ra7 46. Qxg5 Qf2 47. Rh4+ Kg8 48. Nh6+ Kh7 49. Ng4+ {1-0 Kowsarinia,A (2233)-Arat,U (2068)/Kocaeli TUR 2011/The Week in Chess 886}) 20... Qxg3+ ( 20... Qd7 21. b6 Nh5 22. c5 axb6 23. cxd6 Rxc7 24. dxc7 Qxc7 25. Rg2 {1-0 Sadzikowski,D (2380)-Gaehwiler,G (2244)/Caldas Novas BRA 2011/The Week in Chess 889}) 21. Rg2 Qh3 22. Qxd6 Rf7 23. c5 Nf5 {A new move.} (23... Bf8 24. Ne6 Nxe4 25. Qxe5 Nc3 26. Bc4 $18 Qh4 27. Qxc3 {1-0 Van Wely,L (2646)-Golubev, M (2527)/Sovata 2000/EXT 2001}) (23... Nxe4 $5 {Perhaps this.} 24. fxe4 Qc3 25. Rb1 Qe1+ 26. Kh2 Qh4+ 27. Kg1 {And now black can take a draw or even play for a win with 27...Qxd4.}) 24. exf5 Rfxc7 25. Be3 (25. Qe6+ Kh8 26. Bxh6 Qxf5 27. Qxf5 gxf5 $11) (25. Bc4+ $2 Kh8 26. Bxh6 Qxh6 27. Rh2 Qxh2+ 28. Kxh2 Rd7 29. Qe6 Re8 $17 {And white's Q is trapped.}) 25... Qxf5 26. Rf1 Bf8 27. Bd3 e4 ( 27... Bxd6 28. Bxf5 $16) 28. fxe4 Qxf1+ 29. Bxf1 Bxd6 30. cxd6 Rc3 31. Bd4 Rf3 32. e5 Rf4 (32... Rc1 33. Rxg6+ Kh7 34. Rxf6 Rcxf1+ 35. Kh2 $1 $18 (35. Kg2)) 33. Bb2 Nh7 34. e6 Ng5 35. Rxg5 (35. d7 Rcf8 36. e7 Nf3+ 37. Kf2 Nh2+ 38. Ke1 $1 Re4+ (38... Rxf1+ 39. Ke2 $18) 39. Re2 $18) 35... hxg5 36. d7 Rg4+ 37. Bg2 1-0 [/pgn] bielannotatedR3.pgn
  4. As you probably know by now, GM Morozevich has withdrawn from the Biel Chess Festival. Here's the organising committee. Due to health issues, Alexander Morozevich retired from the Biel Grandmaster Tournament after Round 2. He has been this Wednesday with the organisers of the Festival to a hospital, where a doctor confirmed, with a medical certificate, his inability to go on to play the competition. Alexander Morozevich will travel back to Moscow as soon as possible to recover. The length of his healing process is unknown. After the approval of the players, the organisers could secure a substitute. GM Victor Bologan (Moldova, World No 20, 2732 Elo) takes the place of Alexander Morozevich. He arrived already in Biel. He starts the tournament from Round 3. His game against Magnus Carlsen, scheduled for Wednesday July 25th, will be held on Sunday 29th. Victor Bologan will play his first game on Thursday July 26th against Hikaru Nakamura. The 3 points of the victories of Anish Giri and Etienne Bacrot, achieved against Alexander Morozevich, are kept. Victor Bologan accepted to play with two games less. Biel International Chess Festival Organisation Committee As you can probably imagine, there has been much speculation about the coincidence of this withdrawal and the 2-game losing streak of Morozevich in the first 2 rounds (His game against Bacrot, in quite dramatic circumstances, see the analysis of the game in the forum). Although it is easy to label Morozevic as a "softie" I would like to point out 3 things: - A quote from Kasparov: "Chess is the world's toughest sport, much tougher than boxing ..." - The presumption of innocence in countries with a rule of law could be translated here as the "presumption that the reason to withdraw is genuine." - Would it not be reasonable to argue that the 2 losses and the circumstances in which he lost have left him psychologically wounded? It hurts to lose at chess, you and I know how much. Why shouldn't the damage to our psychological state be a reasonable justification? psychological wounds can often be worse than physical ones... True, at a professional level, this incident is not exactly something one would feel proud of. But do not forget that when Morozevic made that decision, he's aware of the consequences... and fortunately it seems that arranging a replacement (Bologan) was done in a quick and efficient manner.
  5. Here are the 3 games from the second round of the Biel tournament with my full annotations. Bacrot's miniature against Morozevic was outstanding! Nice victory Carlsen victory also. Don't forget to choose the game from the menu above the board. Just click on it and choose it. [pgn][Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.24"] [Round "2"] [White "Bacrot, E."] [black "Morozevich, A."] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D31"] [WhiteElo "2713"] [blackElo "2770"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "49"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c6 4. e4 {You don't see this gambit line very often at this level!} dxe4 5. Nxe4 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 Qxd4 7. Bxb4 Qxe4+ 8. Be2 {So, white has not only the a3-f8 diagonal, but his dark squared B is dangerous even without that diagonal. Hundreds of games have been played in this variation.} Na6 9. Bd6 (9. Bc3 {This is another main line.}) 9... Qxg2 (9... e5 10. Nf3 Bg4 11. O-O O-O-O 12. b4 Nf6 13. c5 Ne8 14. Bd3 $1 (14. Rc1 Nxd6 15. cxd6 Kb8 16. Rc4 Qf5 17. Qc1 Bxf3 18. Bxf3 Qe6 19. a4 Qxd6 20. b5 cxb5 21. axb5 Nc7 22. b6 Qxb6 23. Qg5 Qf6 24. Qe3 Nd5 25. Qe4 Qe7 26. Rfc1 g6 27. Qc2 Nb6 28. Rc7 Rd7 29. Rc5 Re8 30. h3 f5 31. Be2 Red8 32. Qc3 e4 33. g4 f4 34. Qb4 f3 35. Bf1 Rd5 36. Qb5 e3 {0-1 Kornev,A (2544)-Galkin,A (2606)/ Dagomys 2008/CBM 124}) 14... Qxb4 15. Rb1 Qa3 $2 (15... Qf4 16. Bxe5 Rxd3 17. Qxd3 Qf5 18. Qxf5+ Bxf5 19. Rbc1 $16) 16. Nxe5 $1 $18 {Javier: And white had a big advantage.} Be6 (16... Bxd1 17. Bf5+ Rd7 18. Bxd7+ Kd8 19. Rxb7 Nec7 20. Rxd1 $18) 17. Nxc6 Nxd6 18. Nxd8 Rxd8 19. Bxa6 Qxa6 20. cxd6 $18 {1-0 Doric,D (2456) - Ribli,Z (2587) Maribor SLO 2011}) 10. Qd2 e5 (10... Qxh1 $2 {Taking the R is suicidal.} 11. O-O-O {With the idea of Bf3} Qe4 12. Be7 $3 {With a winning attack for white.}) (10... Nf6) 11. Bxe5 $146 {A new move.} (11. O-O-O Bf5 12. Bxe5 Ne7 $2 (12... Qe4 13. Bd3 Qxd3 14. Qxd3 Bxd3 15. Bxg7 Nb4 $13) 13. Nf3 f6 14. Rhg1 Qh3 15. Rxg7 $18 fxe5 16. Rxe7+ $1 Kxe7 17. Qd6+ {1-0 Steneskog,P-Eriksson,M (2225)/ Linkoping 1996/ EXT 2000}) (11. Bf3 Qg6 12. Bxe5 Be6 13. O-O-O Nf6 14. Ne2 Qf5 $1 15. Qc3 Nb4 $1 16. Qxb4 Qxe5 17. Rhe1 Qc7 18. Nd4 O-O-O $17 {Salas,C (2126) - Sengupta,D (2562) Seville ESP 2012}) 11... Bf5 (11... Qxh1 12. O-O-O f6 13. Qd8+ Kf7 14. Bd6 $40 {+/-}) 12. Bf3 Qg6 13. O-O-O Nc5 14. Qe3 Bb1 $3 {It takes guts to ignore a discovered attack like the one in this position! Black threatens both ...Qc2# and ...Bxa2.} 15. Rd2 (15. Bxg7+ $2 Ne7 $1 $19) 15... Bxa2 16. Bd6+ Ne6 17. Be4 Qh6 18. f4 Nf6 (18... Bxc4 $5) 19. Nf3 Bxc4 20. Re1 { I must concede that it takes great talent to sense that white's attack is still good enough and worth 3 (!) PP.} O-O-O (20... Bd5 $1 21. Bf5 Rd8 (21... O-O-O $2 22. Ng5 $1 $13) 22. Ba3 Nh5 23. Ng5 Qf6 24. Nxf7 $5 (24. Nxe6 fxe6 25. Bxe6 Bxe6 26. Qxe6+ Qxe6 27. Rxe6+ Kf7 28. Re7+ Kf6 29. Rxb7 Rxd2 30. Kxd2 Nxf4 31. Rxa7 Re8 $17) 24... Kxf7 25. Rxd5 $1 Nhxf4 $1 26. Re5 Rhe8 $17) (20... Nxe4 $2 21. Qxe4 Bd5 22. Rxd5 $1 cxd5 23. Qa4+ Kd8 24. Qa5+ $1 b6 (24... Kd7 $2 25. Ne5+ $1 $18) 25. Qxd5 Rc8+ 26. Kb1 $18) 21. Bxc6 $3 {Beautiful play by Bacrot, although Morozevich now has a draw if he wants it...} Ba6 $2 (21... bxc6 $1 22. Qxa7 Rxd6 23. Qa8+ (23. Rxd6 $2 Qxf4+ 24. Rd2 Nc7 25. Ne5 Re8 $19) 23... Kc7 ( 23... Kd7 $4 24. Qb7+ Nc7 25. Ne5+ $18) 24. Qa7+ (24. Qxh8 $2 Nxf4 25. Re7+ Rd7 26. Rexd7+ Nxd7 $19) 24... Kc8 25. Qa8+ Kc7 26. Qa7+ $11 {Draw by perpetual check.}) (21... Rxd6 $2 22. Rxd6 Kc7 (22... bxc6 $2 23. Rxc6+ Kb7 24. Rxc4 $16) 23. Ne5 $1 Qxf4 24. Qxf4 Nxf4 25. Nxc4 $18) 22. Ng5 $1 {After this I don't think black can hold the position.} Nxg5 $2 {This leads to mate, but what was there to do?} (22... Rxd6 23. Rxd6 Rd8 24. Nxf7 $18) (22... bxc6 23. Qxa7 Rxd6 24. Qxa6+ $18) 23. Bd7+ $3 Kxd7 (23... Rxd7 24. Qc5+ Kd8 25. Be7+ Ke8 26. Qc8+ Rd8 27. Qxd8#) 24. Qe7+ Kc6 25. Qc7+ {A brilliant miniature by France's most talented GM ever.} (25. Qc7+ Kb5 26. Qc5+ Ka4 27. Qb4#) 1-0 [Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.24"] [Round "2"] [White "Carlsen, M."] [black "Wang Hao"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E32"] [WhiteElo "2837"] [blackElo "2739"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "69"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. Qc2 O-O 5. Nf3 b6 6. e4 c5 {Both 6...Bb7 and 6...d5 are more common here.} 7. e5 (7. d5 {This doesn't look too good, although I'm going to suggest a crazy idea.} exd5 8. exd5 $1 (8. cxd5 $2 Nxe4 ( 8... Qe7 {Even this is better for black}) 9. Bd3 Nf6) 8... Re8+ 9. Be3 $5 { This is my idea, based on a some classical games.} (9. Be2 Ba6 $1 10. O-O $2 Bxc3 11. bxc3 Nxd5 $1 $17) 9... Ng4 10. Bd3 {Completely ignoring the threat against e3. Development is everything!} Bxc3+ 11. bxc3 (11. Qxc3 $5 Nxe3 12. fxe3 Rxe3+ 13. Kf2 Re8 14. Rae1 Rxe1 15. Rxe1 d6 16. Ng5 h6 17. Bh7+ Kf8 18. Ne4 {With the idea of Qg3.}) 11... Nxe3 12. fxe3 h6 (12... Rxe3+ 13. Kf2 {And both the black R and the P on h7 are on.}) 13. O-O Rxe3 14. Qf2 Re8 15. Nh4 $18 {Admitedly, not very forcing, but it goes to show you one thing: Study the classics!}) 7... Ne8 (7... cxd4 $5 8. Nxd4 (8. Ng5 $6 h6 9. exf6 hxg5 10. fxg7 Kxg7 11. a3 Be7 $15) (8. a3 $5 {This is the main line here.}) 8... Ne8 9. Qe4 Nc6 10. Nxc6 dxc6 11. Qxc6 Qd4 $1) 8. d5 {Hard to believe, but this is actually a novelty. Both 8.Bd3 and 8.Bg5 had been tried here before.} exd5 9. cxd5 d6 10. Bg5 (10. Ng5 g6 11. Nge4 dxe5 12. Bh6 Ng7 (12... f5 $5 13. Bxf8 Kxf8 14. a3 Ba5 15. Ng3 Bxc3+ (15... Qxd5 $4 16. b4 cxb4 17. Nxd5 b3+ 18. Qc3 $18) 16. Qxc3 Qxd5 17. Rd1 $16) 13. O-O-O $44) 10... f6 11. exf6 Nxf6 12. O-O-O Bxc3 13. bxc3 (13. Qxc3 Ne4 14. Bxd8 Nxc3 15. bxc3 Rxd8 16. Ng5 $5) 13... Bg4 14. Re1 {A classy move!} Bxf3 (14... Nbd7) 15. gxf3 {I think black's position is actually quite difficult to defend. White has the 2 BB and a very annoying g file...} Nbd7 16. Bd3 $14 h6 17. Bf4 (17. Bxh6 $2 {A premature attack.} gxh6 18. Rhg1+ Kh8 19. Qd2 Rf7 20. Qxh6+ Nh7 21. Qxd6 Qf6) 17... c4 (17... Qc7 18. Rhg1 Kh8 (18... Ne5) 19. Re7 Rg8 20. Qd2 $1 $18 {White has too many pieces pointing at black's K.}) 18. Bf5 Nc5 19. Rhg1 Kh8 20. Rg6 Rf7 21. Reg1 $1 (21. Bxh6 gxh6 22. Rxh6+ Nh7 (22... Kg7 $2 23. Rg1+ $1 $18) 23. Rxh7+ Rxh7 24. Bxh7 $16) 21... Qf8 22. Be3 Nxd5 $6 (22... Nfd7 23. Be6 Nd3+ 24. Kb1 Re7 25. Bxd7 Rxd7 26. f4 Re8 27. Bd4 Ree7 28. Rxh6+ Kg8 29. Bf6 Rf7 30. Qe2 $18) 23. Bd4 $1 (23. Bxc5 {This leads to a better position for white, but Carlsen's move is stronger.} bxc5 24. Be6 Nf4 25. Bxf7 Nd3+ 26. Kb1 Rb8+ 27. Ka1 Qxf7 28. Rxg7 ( 28. Rxd6) 28... Qxf3 29. Qd2 $16) 23... Nf6 24. Qd2 $1 Re8 $2 (24... Nd3+ 25. Bxd3 cxd3 26. Qf4 $16 {With a mighty attack. White's d4 B is a monster!}) 25. Rxg7 $1 Qxg7 (25... Rxg7 26. Qxh6+ Kg8 27. Bh7+ $1 $18) 26. Rxg7 Kxg7 27. Qf4 Nd3+ 28. Bxd3 cxd3 29. Kd2 $1 {White's B is still a monster!} Kg6 30. Kxd3 $16 Re6 31. h4 Rfe7 $2 32. h5+ $1 $18 Kf7 (32... Kxh5 33. Qf5+ Kh4 34. Bxf6+ $18) 33. Qf5 Re5 34. Qg6+ Ke6 35. f4 {A fine attacking game by Carlsen.} (35. f4 Rf5 36. Bxf6 Rxf6 37. f5+ Ke5 38. f4+ $18) 1-0 [Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.24"] [Round "2"] [White "Nakamura, Hi"] [black "Giri, A."] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D02"] [WhiteElo "2778"] [blackElo "2696"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. Nf3 d5 2. d4 Nf6 3. c4 e6 4. g3 {Nakamura: parles català? (Do you speak Catalan?)} Bb4+ {Giri: no, gràcies! (No, thanks!)} 5. Bd2 Bxd2+ 6. Nbxd2 O-O 7. Bg2 b6 8. O-O Bb7 9. cxd5 Bxd5 $5 (9... exd5 {This is far more common here.}) 10. Re1 (10. Qc2 Nbd7 11. e4 Bb7 12. b4 $5 {Perhaps this was a better try for an opening advantage.}) 10... Nbd7 11. e4 Bb7 12. e5 {I'm not sure about this, seems a bit premature.} (12. Rc1 c5 13. e5 Nd5 14. Nc4) 12... Nd5 13. Ne4 h6 { Strictly speaking, a new move, but hardly a relevant one. I could only track down one previous game from the position after 13.Ne4, but it's not a very good game, as black blundered fairly quickly.} (13... Rc8 14. Rc1 Re8 15. Nfg5 h6 16. Qh5 Qe7 (16... f6 $4 17. exf6 N7xf6 18. Qf7+ Kh8 19. Nxf6 Qxf6 20. Qxf6 gxf6 21. Nxe6 $16 {1-0 Hauck,B-Schenderowitsch,M/Koblenz 1994/EXT 2001 (60)}) 17. Nf3 Nb4 18. Rc3 Nxa2 19. Ra3 Bd5 20. Rxa7 Qb4) 14. Rc1 Qe7 15. a3 a5 16. Nfd2 Rad8 17. Nc4 Nb8 18. Ne3 Nxe3 (18... Rd7 19. Ng4 Rfd8 $2 20. Nef6+ $1 gxf6 21. Bxd5 $16 {This might have been Nakamura's hope.}) 19. fxe3 (19. Rxe3 c5 20. Nd6 Bxg2 21. Kxg2 Nd7 $11) 19... c5 20. Qg4 Bxe4 {Getting rid of white's most dangerous pieces.} 21. Bxe4 Rc8 22. Rcd1 (22. Bd3 {Perhaps this, intending Qe4. }) 22... Nd7 23. Bb1 b5 24. Qe4 f5 25. Qb7 {Annoying the black pawns on the queenside.} (25. exf6 Nxf6 26. Qg6 c4) 25... Rb8 26. Qa7 (26. Qa6 a4 27. Ba2 c4 ) 26... Ra8 27. Qb7 Rab8 28. Qa7 Ra8 29. Qc7 c4 30. Rf1 (30. d5 Rfc8 31. Qd6 $1 Qxd6 32. exd6 $16) 30... Rfc8 31. Qd6 Qxd6 32. exd6 Nf6 33. g4 $1 {A resourceful move by Nakamura. In fact, I think that's one of his strengths, finding this kind of moves...} (33. d5 exd5 (33... Nxd5 34. Bxf5 $16) 34. d7 ( 34. Bxf5 Re8) 34... Rd8 35. Bxf5 Rab8 36. Rd4 $11) 33... g6 (33... Nxg4 34. d5 e5 (34... Nxe3 $2 35. dxe6) 35. Bxf5 Nxe3 36. Be6+ Kh7 37. Bf5+ Kh8 38. Bxc8 Rxc8 39. Kf2 Nxf1 40. Rxf1 Rf8+ 41. Ke2 Kg8 42. Rc1 Rf6 (42... a4 43. Ke3 Rf6 44. Ke4) 43. Ke3 Kf7 44. a4 Ke8 45. axb5 Kd7 46. Rxc4 Kxd6 47. Ra4 Kxd5 48. Rxa5 $11) 34. gxf5 exf5 35. e4 $1 {White needs to open up some lines for his RR.} Nxe4 36. Bxe4 fxe4 37. Rf6 Kg7 38. Re6 Rf8 (38... Re8 39. Re5 b4) 39. Rxe4 Rad8 40. Re7+ Rf7 41. Rf1 (41. Rf1 Rxe7 42. dxe7 Re8 43. Re1 Kf6 44. Re5 Rxe7 45. Rxb5 Re2 $11) 1/2-1/2 [/pgn] Here's the pgn file if you wish to download it (but you need to be registered. Registration is FREE!) bielannotatedR2.pgn
  6. I've annotated the first 3 games from the Biel tournament. Interesting stuff. Both Giri and Morozevic missed a Queen Sacrifice (time trouble, no doubt). Hao's victory was quite impressive. Anyone can view the games on-line, but if you wish to download the pgn file, please register: it's free! By the way, make sure you click on the board header to change the game you wish to view! [pgn][Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.23"] [Round "1"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [black "Nakamura, Hikaru"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "B53"] [WhiteElo "2837"] [blackElo "2778"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "78"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Qxd4 {Carlsen had tried this in a recent blitz game of his, but I didn't think he'd have the guts to play it in a STC game!} a6 (4... Nc6 5. Bb5 Bd7 6. Bxc6 Bxc6 {And here I think Magnus would have chosen the c4 variation.}) 5. c4 Nc6 6. Qd1 Bg4 7. Be2 Nf6 8. Nc3 Bxf3 $6 {I'm trying hard to understand this move, without success. Surely 8...g6 is correct.} (8... g6) 9. Bxf3 {White has the 2 BB now, and he hasn't had to sweat much to get them.} g6 10. O-O Bg7 11. Be3 O-O 12. Rc1 Nd7 13. Be2 Nc5 14. f3 Rc8 15. Kh1 e5 $1 {Black's eyeing the d4 square. ...Ne6 is going to be next. } 16. Nd5 Ne6 17. Qd2 (17. Rf2 Ncd4 18. Bd3 f5 19. exf5 gxf5 20. Rd2) 17... Ncd4 18. Bd3 Nc7 19. Bg5 $6 (19. Nb6 Rb8 20. Rfd1 Nce6 21. Nd5 Nc7 {Yes, black repeats his strategy, but compared to the game, white's like two tempi up.}) 19... f6 20. Be3 Nxd5 21. cxd5 $14 {White still has a small advantage, but it should fade away soon.} Qb6 22. Rc3 {Black can't take on c3 because of bxc. However, lots of pieces are coming off the board.} Rc5 23. Bxd4 {I couldn't believe this move when I saw it, but on closer look, it really is much better that I thought. White really doesn't have very much anymore.} (23. Rfc1 {The "normal" move.} Rfc8 24. b4 Rxc3 (24... Qxb4 $4 25. Rxc5 $18) 25. Rxc3 Qd8 $1 26. a4 (26. Qc1 Rxc3 27. Qxc3 f5 $1 {And the c file is useless.}) 26... Rxc3 ( 26... f5 $6 27. Bxd4 exd4 28. Rxc8 Qxc8 29. exf5 gxf5 30. Qe1 $5) 27. Qxc3 { Without an entry point along the c-file, white's control of the c-file is not particularly useful.} f5 {Equality.} 28. exf5 Nxf5 29. Bxf5 gxf5 $11) 23... exd4 24. Rcc1 Rxc1 (24... Rfc8 25. Rcd1 $5 {And with c2 covered, d4 will need protection and ...f5 seems out of the question for black.}) 25. Rxc1 Rf7 26. Rc8+ Rf8 27. Rc4 Rf7 28. Qc1 Bf8 $1 29. g3 Be7 $1 30. Kg2 (30. Rc7 Bd8 31. Rxf7 Kxf7 $11) 30... Bd8 $1 {Completing the B's defensive maneuver.} 31. Rc8 Kg7 { ...Rc7 is the "threat".} 32. Qd2 Bc7 {"Trapping" the R. ...Rf8 is next.} 33. h4 Rf8 34. Rxf8 Kxf8 35. h5 Kg7 36. h6+ Kf7 37. f4 Bd8 38. Qf2 Qc5 39. Qe2 Qc1 { Well defended by Nakamura!} 1/2-1/2 [Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.23"] [Round "1"] [White "Wang, Hao"] [black "Bacrot, Etienne"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E97"] [WhiteElo "2739"] [blackElo "2713"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "71"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. O-O Nc6 8. d5 Ne7 9. b4 Nh5 10. g3 f5 11. Ng5 Nf6 12. Bf3 c6 13. Ba3 cxd5 14. exd5 e4 15. Be2 {All book so far.} h6 {A novelty.} (15... Ne8 {This is the move that Giri chose in his game against Kramnik (the world's strongest player on the white side of a King's Indian!) last year.} 16. Rc1 h6 17. Ne6 Bxe6 18. dxe6 Nc7 19. b5 Be5 20. Qb3 Kg7 21. Rfd1 Nxe6 22. c5 $1 Nd4 23. Rxd4 $1 Bxd4 24. cxd6 Ng8 25. Nd5 {And white had a powerful attack.} Kh8 26. Rc7 Be5 27. Bb2 Qxd6 28. Rxb7 g5 29. b6 a5 30. Bh5 Rab8 31. Ra7 Bxb2 32. Qxb2+ Nf6 33. Bf7 Kg7 34. Rd7 Qc6 35. Be6+ {1-0 Kramnik,V (2791)-Giri,A (2722)/Hoogeveen NED 2011/The Week in Chess 884}) (15... Nfxd5 $2 {This is a mistake. Black's toying with the idea of the discovered attack against c3 and the unprotected N on g5, but it backfires.} 16. Nxd5 $1 Bxa1 17. Nxe7+ Qxe7 18. Qd5+ Kg7 19. Rxa1 Qxg5 20. Bb2+ Kh6 21. Qxd6 {White's clearly better. The f8 R is on, Bc1 is possibly a threat, black's K is in trouble... for example, if now} Rd8 $2 22. Qe5 $1 $18) 16. Ne6 Bxe6 17. dxe6 f4 $5 {This was probably what Bacrot had prepared in this variation.} 18. Qd2 (18. Re1 $6 {Planning Bf1 is black goes ...f3.} e3 $1 19. fxe3 fxg3 20. hxg3 Nh5 $1) (18. gxf4 d5 $5 (18... Nf5 $5)) 18... f3 19. Bd1 { The B can get back into play via b3 later.} Qc8 (19... d5 20. cxd5 Nfxd5 21. Nxd5 Bxa1 22. Bb3 $1 {Looks very good for white. The B is on, b5 is coming.}) 20. Re1 Qxc4 (20... Qxe6 21. Bxf3 Qxc4 22. Bd1 $13) 21. Bb3 Qa6 22. Bb2 Rad8 23. Nxe4 Nxe4 24. Rxe4 Bxb2 25. Qxb2 $16 {The resulting position seems to favour white. That P on a6 is very powerful, the Q's diagonal, the B b3, black's weakened Kside...} d5 26. Re3 Rd6 27. Rae1 Qb6 28. Bd1 a5 29. b5 Nf5 30. e7 $1 (30. Rxf3 Rxe6) 30... Re8 31. Re5 Qc7 (31... Nd4 32. R1e3 $16) 32. Bxf3 Rxe7 33. Rxe7 Nxe7 34. Qe5 $1 Kf8 (34... Nf5 35. Bxd5+) 35. Qh8+ Ng8 $2 ( 35... Kf7 36. Qh7+ Kf6 37. Qxh6 $18) 36. Re8+ $3 {A very nice game by Wang. Personally, I think Bacrot's home preparation was rather poor for a 2700+ player.} (36. Re8+ Kxe8 37. Qxg8+ Ke7 38. Qg7+ Kd8 39. Qf8+ Kd7 40. Bg4+ Re6 41. Qf7+ $18) 1-0 [Event "45th Biel GM"] [site "Biel SUI"] [Date "2012.07.23"] [Round "1"] [White "Morozevich, Alexander"] [black "Giri, Anish"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "D97"] [WhiteElo "2770"] [blackElo "2696"] [Annotator "I.M. Javier Gil"] [PlyCount "100"] [EventDate "2012.07.23"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Qb3 dxc4 6. Qxc4 O-O 7. e4 Be6 $5 { This rather unusual and provocative move is the pet line of Turkmen GM Handszar Odeev. The idea is to entice white to play d5, then retreat the B back to c8 and attack white's center by means of ...c6.} 8. Qb5 {A new move, at least on my database. I'm sure Morozevic considered 8.d5 of course, but he wanted to avoid Giri's preparation.} (8. d5 Bc8 9. Bg5 c6 10. Rd1 b5 11. Qb3 Qa5 12. Nd2 a6 13. Be2 cxd5 14. exd5 Nbd7 15. a3 Bb7 {Lima,D (2475)-Odeev,H (2405) Moscow 1994. Odeev ended up winning that game.}) 8... Bd7 9. Qc5 {White thinks ...b6 will create weaknesses in black's position.} b6 10. Qg5 {Nice swing to the other flank. Qh4 and Bh6 is the main idea.} c5 $1 11. dxc5 Bc6 $1 {Black's playing very agressively.} 12. Qh4 bxc5 13. Be2 (13. Bc4 $5 Nbd7 14. O-O) 13... e6 14. Bg5 {Faced with the threat of e5, black's next move is forced.} h6 15. Bxh6 Nxe4 16. Qf4 {A classy move.} (16. Bxg7 Qxh4 17. Nxh4 Kxg7 $11) 16... Nxc3 17. Bxg7 Kxg7 (17... Nxe2 $4 18. Qh6) 18. bxc3 Qf6 {The game is about even now.} 19. Qe3 Nd7 20. O-O Rab8 21. Rfd1 Rfd8 22. h3 Bd5 23. a4 a5 24. Rab1 Bb3 25. Rd6 Bxa4 26. Ra1 Qe7 27. Ra6 Bb5 28. Bxb5 Rxb5 29. Ra7 $5 (29. R6xa5 Rxa5 30. Rxa5 $14) 29... Rdb8 30. Ne5 R8b7 31. Rxb7 Rxb7 32. Rxa5 { Morozevich has played very well to keep the game alive, maintaining some winning chances. What follows now is rather dramatic!} Qd6 $4 {An incredible oversight. At this point, both players were probably in time trouble.} (32... Rb1+ $1 33. Kh2 Qd6 34. f4 {Transposing into the game, was the correct move order for black.}) 33. f4 $4 (33. Qh6+ $1 Kg8 34. Qh8+ Kxh8 35. Nxf7+ Kg7 36. Nxd6 {And black's a P down in the endgame.}) 33... Rb1+ 34. Kh2 Nxe5 35. fxe5 { I think Morozevic was still playing under the inertia of the middlegame. Perhaps this move is still Ok, but from a practical standpoint, considering the time trouble, it was much better to simplify the position and settle for a draw, as defending against black's attack seems rather difficult now...} (35. Qxe5+ Qxe5 36. fxe5 c4 37. Rc5 Re1 38. Rxc4 Rxe5 $11) 35... Qd1 36. Qf2 (36. Rxc5 Qh1+ 37. Kg3 Re1 38. Qf3 Rf1 39. Qe4 {And black's attack seems under control.}) 36... Qh1+ 37. Kg3 Rf1 38. Qxc5 Rd1 39. Qe3 $2 (39. Qf2 $1 {Not only "trapping" the black Q, but also threatening Qf6.} Rd3+ 40. Kh4 g5+ 41. Kxg5 Qc1+ 42. Kg4 {And white still retains all the chances.}) 39... Qf1 $1 { Threatening ...Rd3. Things get nasty for white now.} 40. Kh2 Re1 41. Qd2 $1 { Only move.} (41. Qd4 Qh1+ 42. Kg3 Re2 $19) 41... Qg1+ 42. Kg3 Re3+ 43. Kf4 g5+ 44. Kg4 $2 (44. Kxg5 $1 Rxh3 $1 (44... Rg3+ $2 45. Kh5 $1 {Threatening Qh6+.} Rg6 46. Ra4 $1 {The R gets back into play. Rg4 is next.} Qc5 47. Rg4 Qxe5+ 48. Rg5 $1 $16) 45. Kg4 $8 Rh6 46. Kf3 {And white should be able to hold the position. Black will probably win back one of his PP, but it's not like if white's going to get mated.}) 44... Kh6 $1 45. Ra4 $2 (45. Ra8 $1 Re4+ 46. Kf3 (46. Kg3 Rxe5 (46... Qc5 47. Rh8+ Kg7 48. Qxg5+ $1 Kxh8 49. Qh5+ Kg8 50. Qg5+ $11) 47. Rh8+ Kg7 48. Rd8 Re3+ 49. Kg4 $11)) 45... Rxe5 {It looks pretty bad now...} 46. h4 f6 $2 (46... f5+ $1 47. Kf3 Qf1+ 48. Kg3 f4+ 49. Kg4 Qb5 $3 $19 {Black has a winning attack. The threats, apart from ...Qxa4, are ...Re3 and Rg3, or ....Re2.}) 47. Kf3 Qh2 48. hxg5+ fxg5 49. Re4 $2 (49. Rg4 $1 { Apparently, white could still hold with this move.}) 49... Rf5+ 50. Ke3 Qg3+ { Black resigned.} 0-1 [/pgn] bielannotatedR1.pgn
  7. The 45th edition of the Biel Tournament begins today in Switzerland. 6 Gms are taking part: Magnus Carlsen (Norway, Elo 2837) Hiraku Nakamura (USA, Elo 2778) Alexander Morozevic (Russia, Elo 2770) Wang Hao (PRC, Elo 2739) Etienne Bracto (France, Elo 2713) Anish Giri (Holland, Elo 2696) The tournament is a double round robin, as it should be!. Giri has just won the Dutch Championship and a few people are expecting him to do well here as well, but how well? His rating is actually a little higher (2710 at present) but FIDE only publishes chess ratings on a monthly basis. By the way, Switzerland would be an awesome country to defect to for Wang Hao, although I can't think of any Chinese Elite player who has "migrated" in recent times. But give them time... Official website: http://www.bielchess...val.ch/en/home/
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